Month: August 2019

ASUStek Shows Off Concept Notebooks

first_img Explore further ASUStek is not the only player considering the dual-display design concept. Gizmondo reports that Acer and Mitac Technologies may be entering the mix in developing a notebook with a double-display. ASUS demonstrated the double-display notebook recently at an Intel Developers Conference in San Francisco. The external display provides a sneak peak of most used functions and appears to require very little future improvements. It may be available to the consumer market within a reasonable time. Another ASUStek concept notebook was displayed earlier in the year at Computex,2008. The concept notebook has dual touch screen displays. According to Rick Morris of Digitimes users can interact with the system using touch and gestures. The screens will change automatically depending on the type of activity the user chooses. As an example a screen will show a traditional looking keyboard and track-pad for drafting or editing documents. (PhysOrg.com) — ASUStek showcased its concept notebook with both an internal display and external display for checking e-mail, utilizing a dedicated MP3 key without opening the notebook. The external display concept is borrowed from current cell phones with dual display. The idea of checking e-mail and checking out music while on the run is a novel design concept for notebooks. ASUS one of the leaders in ultra-portable notebooks is a likely candidate for introducing any convenience for commuting users. Netbooks popularity expected to continue in 2010 Mr. Morris speculates the news from Microsoft which revealed Windows 7 will rely to a significant extent on touch-based controls may have contributed to the ASUStek design concept. The good news is the double-touch screen may be available to the consumer within a few years. ASUStek is familiar with putting the pedal to the metal in moving a design to the consumer pipe-line. ASUS incorporation of the Intel Atom processor and energy conservation features moved in sync with Intel. There is little doubt this nimble and agile ultra-portable producer will have a compatible double-display touchscreen ready when Microsoft introduces Windows 7. ASUStek Shows Off Concept Notebooks. Via GIZMODO ASUStek Shows Off Concept Notebooks. Via GIZMODO Citation: ASUStek Shows Off Concept Notebooks (2008, October 23) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2008-10-asustek-concept-notebooks.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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Microsoft puts finger on 1ms touchscreen w video

first_img Microsoft’s ‘Manual Deskterity’ Enhances User Touchscreen Experience (w/ Video) Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Citation: Microsoft puts finger on 1ms touchscreen (w/ video) (2012, March 13) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-03-microsoft-finger-1ms-touchscreen-video.html © 2011 PhysOrg.comcenter_img As Dietz explained, the numbers have to do with the moment the finger touches the screen and the response of the interacting object to the touch of the finger. With touch devices that have a response time of 100ms, the image is 100 milliseconds behind the finger touch. If that delay could be lowered to 1ms, the user might enjoy a better sense of control, a sense of heightened interaction between user and machine.This is especially apparent in drawing something on the tablet, as the demo showed. The finger in the speeded-up response was able to “feel” the drawing of squiggly lines, as in the experience of finger painting. Reactions from the technology press have been agreeable on one point, that mobile users into such activities as gaming or drawing (engineers, architects, scientists as well as artists) would especially recognize the advantages of bringing down latency. Trouble is, a rollout of such low-latency touchscreens is not planned any time soon and might require years, not months, to achieve. In fact, reports The Verge, the demo from the Redmond team “isn’t actually running on a touchscreen display — input reaction is projected onto the surface from above.”Still, Microsoft is planning to work on this concept. Its goal is to keep improving on touchscreen technology. The point of the demo, said Dietz, was to show that “What we have done is that we set a bar for where we would like to head” in years to come. He could have added that the video also furthers Microsoft’s attempts to rebrand itself. Lagging behind Apple and Google in the mobile marketplace, Microsoft is putting much effort into product introductions to attract a “Kinect” generation of mobile users who will readily respond to novel ways in which humans and objects connect. As for setting the bar, the impressive demo might give competitors some motivation as well. Matthew Humphries in Geek.com makes the observation that “touchscreen latency will become a selling point for a manufacturer. When the Retina Display resolution demonstrated on the new iPad is the norm, you need another selling point to make your tablet stand out among the competition.” Humphries said he is “pretty sure that 100ms average latency will start dropping as the next few waves of tablet appear.” (PhysOrg.com) — Touchscreen features in smartphones and tablets are satisfying perks in going wireless and mouse-less in mobile computing, but now Microsoft wants to make people aware of how much more satisfying the touchscreen experience might be. In a What-If demo by Paul Dietz of Microsoft Applied Sciences Group, Microsoft is suggesting that a far better experience can be had with a touchscreen display system with far less latency than what users are accustomed to. The video succeeds in suggesting what the speed-up might feel like, from finger to screen. In brief, goodbye to finger lag. Miocrosoft’s Dietz used a test setup to examine different time periods of latencies, from 100ms down to 1ms in time delays.last_img read more

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Red light goes green Metalfree organic sensitizers portend significant advance in artificial

first_img(Phys.org)—Photosynthesis – the ubiquitous yet remarkable process by which most plants, algae, and cyanobacteria convert light energy into chemical energy – provides the atmospheric oxygen and organic compounds fundamental to the evolution of life on Earth, and in so doing captures some six times more energy than humans consume while annually converting roughly 100 billion tons of carbon into biomass. In the effort to find alternatives to fossil fuels, the field of artificial photosynthesis – a chemical process that replicates natural photosynthesis – seeks to capture and store energy from visible light, including sunlight, in the chemical bonds of what is known as a solar fuel (for example, hydrogen, methane or methanol). Citation: Red light goes green: Metal-free organic sensitizers portend significant advance in artificial photosynthesis (2015, February 18) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-02-red-green-metal-free-sensitizers-portend.html Explore further © 2015 Phys.org “There are not many molecules that combine all the right properties,” Mallouk notes, these being:strongly absorbing in the visible spectrumlong-lived excited state that is energetically capable of rapidly injecting an electron into the conduction band of titanium dioxide (TiO2)highly oxidizing in its oxidized formchemically stable over many cycles of photoredox reactions (those that harness visible light energy to accelerate a chemical reaction via a single-electron transfer) To be both effective and efficient, artificial photosynthesis requires tunable photosensitizers (light-absorbing molecules also referred to simply as sensitizers that mediate reactions to light) to capture, convert, and transfer visible light energy. To also be practical, these sensitizers must have a very specific absorption, excitation, oxidative, and stability profile; react strongly to red light; and use readily available materials. Recently, scientists at Pennsylvania State University, University Park and Arizona State University, Tempe designed and demonstrated metal-free organic photosensitizers that meet these criteria, thereby achieving photoelectrochemical water oxidation at a level comparable to sensitizers based on rare materials while being the first artificial molecules to oxidize water using only red light.Prof. Thomas E. Mallouk discussed the paper that he, Dr. John R. Swierk and their co-authors published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Describing the challenges of showing that metal-free organic photosensitizers are capable of driving photoelectrochemical water oxidation, Mallouk points out that while water splitting to hydrogen and oxygen is a thermodynamically straightforward reaction – it can be driven by light anywhere in the visible spectrum – a detailed thermodynamic analysis published in 1985 showed that light of wavelength shorter than 775 nm can in principle drive efficient solar water splitting1. “However,” Mallouk tells Phys.org, “there are a number of practical constraints for a system in which light is absorbed by a molecule and the molecule then oxidizes water to make oxygen” Excited states do not last long, and there is a strong driving force for them to return to the ground state, usually by a series of thermodynamically downhill and rapid electron transfer steps.”In both natural and artificial photosynthetic systems, the light-absorbing molecule in its excited state transfers an electron to an acceptor, which in the research being discussed is an oxide semiconductor electrode. “The oxidized form of the molecule must then take an electron from water – usually via another molecule that catalyzes water oxidation – before the photoinjected electron comes back from the semiconductor and regenerates the ground state. The back electron transfer process is parasitic, in that it converts the energy of the excited state into heat.” Moreover, Mallouk says, back electron transfer is typically fast – occurring in 100 microseconds or less – and so to oxidize water the oxidized dye molecule needs to work quickly, meaning that it has to be a fairly powerful oxidizer – at least 300 mV more positive in the electrochemical series than the oxygen/water couple. The Z-scheme electron transport chain links the two photosystems found in plants, algae and cyanobacteria. Credit: Wikimedia Commons. Licensed under GFDL/CC BY-SA 3.0. , Journal of the American Chemical Society The paper also notes that while the open-circuit photovoltages and integrated photocurrents are quite similar for most of the free-base porphyrin sensitizers, the scientists’ deeper analysis of the spectral and electrochemical properties of the sensitizers reveals significant differences. “We found that changing the substituents on the porphyrin ring had a relatively small effect on the energy of the excited state, which correlates with the difference between the excited and ground state oxidation potentials,” Mallouk explains. “However, changing the substituents did significantly shift these potentials relative to the oxygen/water potential.” For example, with electron-withdrawing substituents the oxidized form of the molecule was a more powerful oxidant, but the excited state was a weaker reductant. “There’s a tradeoff between these properties since one would like both electron injection from the excited state and oxidation of water from the oxidized form of the dye to be fast processes – and the rates of these processes depend on and are sensitive to the electrochemical driving force for electron transfer.”In the paper, the scientists discuss their ideas on developing a kinetic picture to enable rational design strategies for improving the system. Previously, they had developed2 a model for dye-sensitized water splitting photoelectrochemical cells that incorporates the kinetics of all the electron transfer reactions in the system. “These processes,” Mallouk tells Phys.org, “include electron injection from the excited state molecule into the TiO2 semiconductor, electron transfer from the water oxidation catalyst to the oxidized dye, electron transport in the TiO2 electrode, electron hopping between sensitizer molecules, and two parasitic recombination processes – that is, back electron transfer from TiO2 to the oxidized dye, and electron scavenging by the water oxidation catalyst. While the recombination processes are winning the battle, so the overall quantum yield of water splitting is low, we know that all the electron transfer rates depend strongly on the distance between redox partners – so we hope to slow down the parasitic reactions using core-shell electrode structures, a strategy already demonstrated with ruthenium-containing sensitizers by our team and by Prof. Thomas J. Meyer’s group at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. We’re also investigating molecular catalysts in order to shorten the electron hopping pathway from the dye to the catalyst.” What’s critical is that each of these design ideas can be tested by measuring the kinetic rate constants, which the scientists obtain from the time-dependent photocurrent and photovoltage in the cell.A central point made in the paper is that the utilization of red light to drive water splitting represents a significant step forward for molecular photoelectrochemical water-splitting systems. “Yes, it’s an important step,” Mallouk explains, “because red light accounts for most of the energy in the solar spectrum. In addition, there are other macrocyclic compounds that are structurally related to porphyrins that while being a bit more challenging to synthesize are much stronger red light absorbers. We hope to investigate those molecules in the future.”In addition to developing core-shell structures and molecular catalysts, as discussed above, the scientists are creating sensitizer molecules that should absorb more strongly in the red visible spectrum. Moreover, the Arizona State team has made linked sensitizer-mediator molecules that speed up electron transfer between the catalyst and the sensitizer molecule. “We’re also working on a molecular photocathode assembly that should develop sufficient photovoltage to generate hydrogen without applying a bias voltage to the cell,” Mallouk adds. “Together with the photoanode assembly, this will make a photoelectrochemical ‘Z-scheme’ in which two photons are absorbed – one at the anode, the other at the cathode – for each electron transferred in the cell.” The so-called Z‐scheme typically refers to oxidation/reduction processes in reactions to light during natural photosynthesis.”As part of this project,” Mallouk concludes, “we and other groups have begun to develop membranes for use in water splitting solar cells3,4,5. “We believe that the membrane results could be broadly applicable to electrolyzers and related technologies for solar fuels, including systems that reduce CO2 to carbon-containing fuels.” This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.center_img More information: Metal-free organic sensitizers for use in water-splitting dye-sensitized photoelectrochemical cells, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Published online before print January 12, 2015, doi:10.1073/pnas.1414901112Related: 1Limiting and realizable efficiencies of solar photolysis of water, Nature (1985) 316: 495-500, doi:10.1038/316495a0 2Effects of electron trapping and protonation on the efficiency of water-splitting dye-sensitized solar cells, Journal of the American Chemical Society (2014) 136:10974-10982, doi:10.1021/ja5040705 3Resistance and polarization losses in aqueous buffer–membrane electrolytes for water-splitting photoelectrochemical cells, Energy & Environmental Science (2012) 5:7582-7589, doi:10.1039/C2EE03422K 4Assessing the utility of bipolar membranes for use in photoelectrochemical water-splitting cells, Chemistry & Sustainability, Energy & Materials, (2014) 7:3017–3020, doi:10.1002/cssc.201402535 5Use of bipolar membranes for maintaining steady-state pH gradients in membrane-supported, solar-driven water splitting, Chemistry & Sustainability, Energy & Materials, (2014) 7:3021-3027, DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201402288 Journal information: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Selected electron transfer processes in WS-DSPEC: (i) injection, (ii) recombination, (iii) hole transfer, (iv) regeneration of oxidized sensitizer, and (v) transport to the fluorine-doped tin oxide anode. Credit: Swierk JR, et al. (2015) Metal-free organic sensitizers for use in water-splitting dye-sensitized photoelectrochemical cells. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 112(6): 1681-1686. , Energy & Environmental Science , Nature “To date,” he adds, “the field has been dominated by studies of ruthenium- and iridium-containing coordination compounds that combine these properties – but our paper explores the idea of using porphyrins in place of ruthenium and iridium complexes in a water-splitting dye-sensitized photoelectrochemical cell.” Porphyrins (macrocyclic organic compounds (that is, those with a ring structure consisting of 12 or more atoms) structurally related to the pigments in chlorophyll and hemoglobin are strongly absorbing. Moreover, with the right substituents (atoms or group of atoms taking the place of another atom or group or occupying a specified position in a molecule), porphyrins have the photoredox properties needed to drive water oxidation in a dye-sensitized electrode – and unlike ruthenium and iridium, are neither rare nor expensive. To accomplish this, the scientists had to synthesize the dye molecules, incorporate them into the cell with appropriate catalyst particles, and quantify the oxygen generated at the illuminated photoelectrodes.The researchers also demonstrated that under broadband illumination, these metal-free organic photosensitizers exhibit activity comparable to that of ruthenium-containing photosensitizers. “The activity is assessed by measuring the photocurrent and oxygen evolution yield as a function of the applied bias potential,” Mallouk explains. “Earlier studies had already established the 2:1 H2/O2 stoichiometry of water splitting in this kind of cell, where hydrogen is made by reduction of water at a dark platinum counter electrode.” (Stoichiometry is the relationship between the relative quantities of substances taking part in a reaction or forming a compound, typically a ratio of whole integers.)Another important finding presented in the paper was that this is the first molecular photosensitizer, outside of natural photosynthesis, that can drive water oxidation utilizing only red light. (Previous research based on ruthenium split water – but only using blue light.) Mallouk emphasizes that since porphyrins absorb strongly between the Soret band and the Q-bands (400-450 nm and 500-670 nm, respectively), it was important to show that the system worked under red light (wavelengths longer than 590 nm) – that is, so that absorption was occurring only in the Q-band region – because most of the photon flux in sunlight is in the red and near-infrared part of the spectrum. “Previously” he points out, “only metal-containing sensitizers that absorb in the blue at wavelengths shorter than 500 nm had been used in this kind of water splitting cell.”A significant challenge the Arizona State part of the team faced was to design and synthesize porphyrin molecules that were sufficiently oxidizing to drive the rapid oxidation of water, as well as sufficiently reducing in their excited state to rapidly inject an electron into the titanium dioxide conduction band. “We tuned the oxidizing power of the porphyrins by placing appropriate substituents on the porphyrin ring,” Mallouk recounts. “In addition, the porphyrins needed to be designed with specific functional groups that would allow attachment to the oxide electrode surface.” To that end, the Penn State part of the team had to determine the right conditions for adsorbing these molecules on the electrode surface, which was made easier by their already having worked out the testing conditions and the methods for determining electron transfer rate constants from earlier studies with other dye molecules. Mimicking photosynthesis path to solar-derived hydrogen fuel Free-base porphyrin sensitizers used in this study. Compound acronyms are defined in SI Appendix. Credit: Swierk JR, et al. (2015) Metal-free organic sensitizers for use in water-splitting dye-sensitized photoelectrochemical cells. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 112(6): 1681-1686.last_img read more

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Study suggests female reproductive tract may have evolved to favor faster swimming

first_img Play Highly motile sperm pass the barrier while the slower ones stay behind. Credit: Zaferani et al., Sci. Adv. 2019;5: eaav2111 The researchers noted that when swimming through their device, the sperm tended to congregate in a butterfly shape when approaching a stricture, with the faster swimmers at the front. That gave them an earlier go at the stricture. Additionally, they found that as the faster swimmers up front made their way to the stricture, they were repelled by the fast-moving fluid. But in being repelled, they were pushed against the walls of the structure leading to the stricture in which the fluid was not moving as fast. That gave them an easier passage and a leg up in reaching the egg and implanting before the slower sperm could catch up. Medical researchers have long suspected that there are features of the female anatomy that favor faster-swimming sperm—though there is no evidence that faster swimming sperm offer any genetic advantages over their slower colleagues. Still, scientists would like to know if this is the case, because it might provide hope to men who wish to conceive but have slow swimmers (low motility). To learn more about the success rates of slow- versus fast-swimming sperm, the researchers built a device to mimic some of the more intricate parts of the female reproductive tract. They note that similar studies in the past have tested sperm swimming in ways similar to testing human swimming—by testing them in a straight-line course from beginning to end. The researchers note that the female reproductive tracts is anything but straight and it also has obstacles—like for instance strictures, which are parts of a tract that narrow. When a fluid moves from a wide channel to a narrow channel, it speeds up. Inside the female reproductive tract, there are fluids that are always on the move, thus, sperm need to swim upstream the whole time. When they reach a stricture, the going gets even more difficult. PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQuality0SpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreen Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. A trio of researchers with Cornell University and Weill Cornell Medicine has found evidence that the female reproductive tract may have evolved to favor faster-swimming sperm. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, Meisam Zaferani, Gianpiero Palermo and Alireza Abbaspourrad describe their study of human and bull sperm swimming in artificial devices and what they found. Sperm trajectory behind a fluid mechanical barrier. Credit: Zaferani et al., Sci. Adv. 2019;5: eaav2111center_img Device to corral viable sperm may speed IVF process Journal information: Science Advances © 2019 Science X Network Citation: Study suggests female reproductive tract may have evolved to favor faster swimming sperm (2019, February 14) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-02-female-reproductive-tract-evolved-favor.html Sperm trajectory behind a fluid mechanical barrier. Credit: Zaferani et al., Sci. Adv. 2019;5: eaav2111last_img read more

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Teenage Swedish Climate Activist Crosses Atlan

first_imgThe teenager refused to fly to avoid a plane’s gas emissions. Action against climate change has been a theme of protests she’s led in Sweden that inspired student strikes in about 100 cities worldwide. Teenage Swedish Climate Activist Crosses Atlantic 8.28.19 9:32am A 16-year-old Swedish climate activist has crossed the Atlantic on a zero-emissions sailboat to attend a conference on global warming. by Associated Press On Wednesday before dawn, Greta Thunberg tweeted , “Land!! The lights of Long Island and New York City ahead.”center_img Photo Courtesy: Wikimedia Commons She and a sailing crew encountered rough seas on the way to New York. They are expected to step off the boat at a marina in lower Manhattan on Wednesday afternoon. She is also set to speak at the United Nations Climate Action Summit next month.last_img read more

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Second Death At West Virginia VA Hospital Rule

first_img by NPR News Vanessa Romo 8.28.19 11:15pm The widow of a veteran who died under suspicious circumstances at a West Virginia Veteran Affairs hospital last year told NPR an autopsy report found the 81-year-old died of an unnecessary insulin injection. It is the second confirmed homicide in a string of deaths at the facility that are being investigated. The widow, Norma Shaw, referred further questions to her lawyer, David Glover. He said the body of George Nelson Shaw Sr. was exhumed in January. Shortly afterward, he said, the family received an autopsy from an Armed Forces medical examiner “that talked about a severe hypoglycemic event.””It listed the cause of death as insulin administration,” Glover said, adding that while Shaw had other ailments, he was not diabetic. Insulin can cause hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, in non-diabetics and can be deadly. The Office of Inspector General for the Department of Veteran Affairs confirmed on Tuesday officials are investigating several suspicious deaths at Louis A. Johnson VA Medical Center in Clarksburg. In a statement, the Inspector General’s office said it has been working with federal law enforcement partners “to investigate the allegations of potential wrongdoing resulting in patient deaths.” It did not specify the number of deaths that are being reviewed nor the time frame of the fatalities. The announcement of the ongoing investigations comes after a wrongful death claim was filed with the VA last week, regarding the death of retired Army Sgt. Felix Kirk McDermott. An autopsy of the 82-year-old who died in April 2018 showed McDermott received “one massive insulin injection” that killed him within a matter of hours, the family’s attorney Tony O’Dell told NPR. The complaint filed by O’Dell alleges the Inspector General’s office is investigating up to 10 other cases in which veteran patients died of hypoglycemia caused by insulin injections. Over the past week, he said, he’s been contacted by multiple families seeking answers to unexplained hypoglycemic deaths dating as far back as June of 2017. “Whenever there’s an unexplained death or a suspicious death, the hospital has to report it and they go through a process looking for the root cause,” O’Dell explained. “The fact that that did not happen here tells you that there was a complete system failure at this hospital,” he said. Officials at the medical center said in an emailed statement that the allegations of potential misconduct do not involve “current” employees. The VA has yet to publicly identify any person of interest. Reports of the suspicious deaths have drawn ire from the public and politicians, including U.S. Sens. Joe Manchin and Shelley Moore Capito who were informed of the investigations several weeks ago. In a letter to VA Secretary Robert Wilkie and Inspector General Michael Missal on Tuesday, Manchin, who sits on the Senate Veterans Affairs Committee, urged them to “quickly complete” the investigations into the potential homicides. “I also ask you to contact grieving family members and share as much information as you can with them.” he wrote, adding that as of this morning he had heard from seven families seeking information into the deaths of their loved ones. Manchin also expressed frustration with the lack of communication and transparency from either office regarding the investigations. “Let us not forget that there are Veterans families who are in grief because of this terrible situation,” he said. Emily Allen from West Virginia Public Broadcasting contributed to this story.Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit NPR. Andrew Harnik Second Death At West Virginia VA Hospital Ruled As Homicide last_img read more

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Man arrested for bomb threats says wanted to have fun

first_imgSunny Sharma, who hails from Shiv Vihar area near Karala in northwest Delhi, worked as a salesman at a dry fruits outlet at the Vyapar Kendra in posh Sushant Lok area of Gurgaon. He was living in a rented accommodation in Jharsa village near Sector 32.Sharma, who is married and a father of two children, “wanted to check police alertness and did all this for fun”, Gurgaon Commissioner of Police Navdeep Singh Virk told media persons on Thursday.He was tracked down to Gurgaon’s Sushant Lok area and arrested on Thursday afternoon. Also Read – Need to understand why law graduate’s natural choice is not legal profession: CJISharma had kept Gurgaon police on their toes for the second consecutive day on Thursday with a call about a high intensity bomb planted at a shopping complex. The threat turned out to be a hoax.The Arcadia shopping complex in South City area was evacuated after police received the call.Hundreds of policemen, bomb disposal and sniffer dog teams along with fire fighters took part in the search operation. After a five-hour search, police said the call was a hoax. Also Read – Health remains key challenge in India’s development: KovindPolice had on Wednesday received a similar call about a bomb being planted at the HUDA City Centre Metro station and a market in Gurgaon which too were found to be hoaxes.Both the calls were made from the same number.Police said the mobile number used to make the bomb threat call was issued in Odisha in the name of Saroj Kumar Malik. The phone was lost on Dec 16 at the Vyapar Kendra.Sharma, a school passout, on Wednesday made the call to the Gurgaon police control room and on Thursday to the Delhi police control room. He said he visited his house in Delhi to make the call and see the police reaction.”Gurgaon police was informed by Delhi Police about the bomb threat. The caller used the same mobile number he used for a threat call on Wednesday,” a police officer told IANS.The caller’s location was found to be in the National Capital Region (NCR), he said.Metro services were on Wednesday affected for over two-and-a-half hours after a bomb threat at the HUDA City Centre station.The station was emptied after police received a call from a man who said a bomb was planted in the station’s basement.A bomb threat call also forced police to clear out people from the Vyapar Kendra and Galleria Market in New Gurgaon.Police commandos tried to find the bombs as claimed in the threats. The three-hour search operation by over 400 policemen revealed that the bomb scare was a hoax.The man said in the 20-second phone call: “I have planted a high intensity bomb in a car parked in the basement of the HUDA City Centre station. I have also done so in two markets of New Gurgaon. ‘Bacha sako to bacha lo’ (Save if you can).”last_img read more

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HMC to set up 3 primary health centres

first_imgKolkata: In a bid to provide better health service to citizens, Howrah Municipal Corporation (HMC) is setting up more urban primary health centres, which will start functioning in the next one and a half months.The civic body has taken up a project to set up three more urban primary health centres, which will take up their total number to 15. At present, 12 are functioning in the area under the municipal corporation, but the project to set up three more primary health centres was taken up to ensure better health service to the residents. Also Read – Heavy rain hits traffic, flightsThe three health centres are coming up at ward number 10, 19 and 61 of the municipal corporation and the location to set up the same was identified following a proper assessment.The health centre at ward number 10 is coming up at Sitanath Bose Lane near Salkia. The one in ward 19 is coming up at Bellilious Lane and the third one in ward number 61will be developed at 273 GT Road.The construction of the buildings of the primary health centres has already started. The work is going on in full swing to ensure that all the three primary centres can be made functional in the next one and a half months. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Merc, 2 B’deshi bystanders killedDr Rathin Chakraborty, Mayor of HMC, said: “It is the policy of the state government to take all necessary measures to provide health service to the people and setting up of the three new primary health centres will ensure the same.”Bhaskar Bhattacharjee, MMIC (Health), said: “We expect that the fully equipped health centres can be opened in the next one and a half months for common people.”There will be all sorts of facilities in the health centres, including pathological laboratories and diagnostic centres, where different tests will be carried out free of cost. There will also be the facility of carrying out tests for dengue and malaria.Besides the pathological laboratories, there will also be out patient departments in the health centres. At the same time, steps have been taken to ensure presence of minor operation theatres in all the three primary health centres.last_img read more

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Rural Polls Mixed mandate in tea belt

first_imgAlipurduar: Voting was peaceful in the Dooars tea belt and several workers along with their families turned up at the booths to exercise their franchise. Observers said the brew belt would come up with a mixed mandate in the rural polls.Also, there was a steady response of voters on the closed tea estates of Alipurduar and Jalpaiguri districts.The observers said the mandate from the tea belt was likely to be a mixed one. “It is unlikely that one party will have a clean sweep over all seats in the tea belt. There are still unsolved issues like fixing of minimum wages and reopening of gardens which have been shut for over a decade or so,” an observer said. Also Read – Heavy rain hits traffic, flightsIn Alipurduar, both the BJP and Trinamul are eyeing the tea belt which has 10 zilla parishad seats. The total number of seats is 18.”Mandate of the tea population is very important for each political party. For the BJP, it is a challenge to retain its support base, while Trinamul wants to prove itself as the force to be reckoned within the area,” the observer said.Mohan Sharma, the chairman of the Trinamul Congress Cha Bagan Mazdoor Union, said: “Tea workers will be with us because we have reopened the closed gardens.”last_img read more

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Rishi Kapoor Abhishek sing really well Lata

first_imgMelody queen Lata Mangeshkar is all praise for the singing skills of veteran actor Rishi Kapoor and his All Is Well co-star Abhishek Bachchan after seeing them croon on a reality show.The two actors were the guests on a singing talent hunt, where they came to promote their upcoming drama All Is Well. They took to stage to sing popular songs from their films.While Rishi, 62, sang Mai shayar toh nahin from his debut movie Bobby, Abhishek, 39, crooned his hit number Right here right now from Bluffmaster!. He was also the voice behind the song in the film. Also Read – A fresh blend of fameThe 85-year-old singing legend took to Twitter to heap praise on the stars.“Few days ago, I watched the Indian Idol Junior episode that featured Rishi Kapoor and Abhishek Bachchan. They were enjoying the performance of every contestant. “When Rishi ji was called to sing on stage and he sang ‘Main shayar toh nahi’, I was surprised. I did not know he has such a melodious voice.“Abhishek sang after him and he also sang really well. I give them my best wishes,” Lata wrote.last_img read more

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