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Aetas show endurance, skills in Allianz ‘Conquer Challenge’ race

first_img“OCR is really getting traction with the Philippines, especially with our partnership with Conquer Challenge which has made OCR accessible to Filipinos,” said Communications Director Rei Abrazaldo.“We are exploring discussions with the Conquer Challenge group on how again we can make a difference next year. This year we had three races, we had a night race as well.” Abrazaldo said. “We’re looking at other options to reach more Filipinos.”Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Gretchen Barretto’s daughter Dominique graduates magna cum laude from California college LATEST STORIES After winning title, time for LA Tenorio to give back to Batangas folk Japeth Aguilar embraces role, gets rewarded with Finals MVP plum View comments MOST READ ‘Mia’: Rom-com with a cause a career-boosting showcase for Coleen Garcia Team Lakay celebrates Christmas with four world titles, experiences to share The Aetas, though, seemed to like the toughest parts of the race like Jacob King, 21, who enjoyed the rope climb part–which a lot of participants were not able to finish.“I’m used to it (rope climb). In my area, there were a lot of big tree roots and we climb them so I know how to do it,” King, a student in  Villa Maria Integrated School in Porac, told INQUIRER.net.The tandem of Jacob King and Allianz exec Alexander Grenz. CONTRIBUTED PHOTO“We believe Obstacle Racing fits very well (for Filipinos). In life, you have overcome a lot of obstacles and you need someone to help you. Like today in the race, with the Aetas together, you need a partner who can help you,” said Allianz chief operating officer Alexander Grenz, who was King’s partner for the race.Allianz vowed that its work with Aetas of Porac, Pampanga “is not a one-time affair,” like its support for Obstacle Course Racing in the Philippines.The insurance company started its partnership with Conquer Challenge PH, one of the local brands for OCR in the country, last year and with the boom of the sport, Allianz is expected to continue its help.ADVERTISEMENT Nadine Lustre’s phone stolen in Brazil No.13 lucky for Orlando Bloom Will you be the first P16 Billion Powerball jackpot winner from the Philippines? Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award Twenty-one Aetas and partnered with Allianz employees for the 10-kilometer race lined with 25 physically-demanding obstacles that were sure to test one’s stamina.But the Aetas were undaunted by the obstacles that were meant for elite athletes, who also competed in the race which served as one of the qualifiers for the national team pool with OCR part of next year’s Southeast Asian Games.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSJapeth Aguilar wins 1st PBA Finals MVP award for GinebraSPORTSGolden State Warriors sign Lee to multiyear contract, bring back ChrissOne of the obstacles during the 10-km Conquer Challenge. CONTRIBUTED PHOTO“I had a lot of fun, I learned a lot too. The obstacles earlier were like a lesson in life. If you don’t work hard enough for something, you really won’t be able to achieve your goals,” Reina Baclay, 18, told INQUIRER.net after the race.On top of a long run under the heat of the sun, the participants had to overcome hurdles like balance beams, rope climbs, monkey bars, warped wall, slingshot, and dead ball carry among others. Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Jacob King tries to finish one of the obstacles during the Allianz Conquer Challenge. CONTRIBUTED PHOTOCLARK–In one of the hardest races of the Allianz Conquer Challenge, one of the premier obstacle course races in the Philippines, this year, selected Aetas showcased their skills and endurance last Sunday at Clark Global City.The Aetas from Porac, Pampanga–one of the communities that Allianz Philippines, the title sponsor of the Conquer Challenge Race, supports–were introduced to Obstacle Course Racing in an effort to promote social inclusion.ADVERTISEMENTlast_img read more

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Liberia’s National Museum ‘Needs Overhaul’

first_imgThe national museum of Liberia is more than a century’s old and in deplorable conditions, with fissures in the walls, flakes of paint peeling off and molds visible on almost every aspect of the building. Rainwater seeps in through leakages in the roof and the ceilings look ready to collapse.Erected in 1862 and once hosting the house of legislators and Supreme Court of Liberia, the museum underwent a minor repair believed to have been the first of its kind after the country’s fourteen-year-old civil war. The first tiers of the building, which contain memoirs of past presidents and cartographical materials, related to Liberia’s culture artifacts, are being destroyed gradually due to rainwater and poor methods of preservation.The second and third tiers of the museum containing art galleries that illustrate Liberia’s artistic works appear to be in a better condition than the first tier of the building. However the museum lacks electricity, pipe-borne water, there is no safety hazard, and most cultural artifacts are being ruined.Louise McMillian, Assistant Minister for Culture at the Ministry of Information Cultural Affairs and Tourism (MICAT) said: “We are aware of the museum’s condition and renovation is underway for this month.”Min. McMillian noted that the renovation of the museum doesn’t only include the building but also every cultural artifact that has been damaged. “All those items that are partly or fully damaged will be restored and preserved for the future generation,” Min. McMillian said, adding: “When the renovation is completed it will restore the museum’s dignity as a place to learn the country’s heritage.”Min. McMillian put the cost of transformation of the museum to the amount of US$345,000, but fell short of disclosing when the project would be completed.She said further “all documents like the book of condolence of late President W.V.S. Tubman that has had some parts damaged will be placed in a glass enclosure for proper documentation.”The Minister explained that after renovation the museum will have electricity, pipe-borne water and safety hazards, and a tight security system will be implemented. Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Govt in flagrant breach of labour laws – Union

first_img50 per cent severance pay…more protests likelyAcknowledging receipt of information that Government is getting ready to pay 50 per cent of the severance due retrenched sugar workers, the Guyana Agricultural and General Workers Union (GAWU) has expressed disappointment with the Government’s continued refusal to pay redundant sugar workers their full severance due.Speaking to this publication on Thursday, GAWU President, Komal Chand, took the Government to task for the continued deferment of full payment in this regard. He argued that the decision breaches the Termination of Employment and Severance Pay Act.“They ought, in the first place, to have a month’s notice after the issue would have been discussed with (the workers’) union,” Chand said, reading from the legislation. “Having reached that point, they (have to) provide the employees with their notices. They ought to get, at the end of the notice, their severance pay. Those people that GuySuCo paid severance to so far, that has been complied with,” he explained.“But this large number (4000), they have not complied with that stipulation. The notice expired on the 29 December, and they were expected to be paid by then. But the most fundamental point is that the payment ought to be done altogether. In fact, it is due since December,” Chand furthered.Chand explained that the severance pay for each worker is approximately $1 million, with differences in the sum according to work description. He noted that with this full sum, workers caught unprepared by the closure of estates would have been cushioned and empowered to get back on their feet.Chand said the payment of half the sum due the workers is unacceptable, and is an “eye-pass” to the workers. He also said that even the $100 million set aside for training workers is inadequate, as it works out to approximately $25,000 per worker.“The law ought to be respected, and (no less a person than) the President ought to respect the law. He is the President, and this is a bad example (he is setting). You set a bad precedent for other Government agencies to do the same, and private employers could follow suit and delay workers’ entitlement, like severance pay, for longer periods. So we hope that more people will come out and speak. It’s an important principle, and it’s a legal entitlement,” Chand declared.According to Chand, the GAWU does not buy Government’s argument that it cannot find the money to pay workers their full due. He posited that a bank loan could be obtained, and noted that once the Government guarantees a bank loan, then an entity (in this case GuySuCo) would have no difficulty in securing a bank loan.ProtestsChand also noted the likelihood of further protests even after the announcement of half payments of severance. According to Chand, the workers on the ground are themselves pushing for more protests in order to get their due.“I came from Berbice this morning. There was a large turnout of workers, and they were very much dismayed, having heard the President’s statement yesterday. And they asked us, ‘Let us go back and have more protests!“And they (said they) would get their children and their spouses to come out. (They said) that they just can’t accept this. And so the mood is now developing for stronger protests over this issue.”Government announced on Wednesday that it would pay 50 per cent of the severance benefits to dismissed sugar workers by the end of this month. This commitment represents more than $2 billion in severance payments.This announcement was made in the National Assembly by Prime Minister Moses Nagamootoo, who read a statement from President David Granger. The remainder of the severance would be paid in the second half of the year.This move comes one day after disgruntled workers attached to the former Rose Hall Sugar Estate protested for their severance payment as they demanded that the Government get its act together.Eight hundred and fifty workers, whose last day of employment was December 29, on Tuesday protested the non-payment of millions of dollars which are collectively owed to them by the David Granger Administration and the Guyana Sugar Corporation (GuySuCo).last_img read more

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Probe into arbitrary firing of PSM staff completed

first_img– Govt yet to disclose findingsMore than three weeks have elapsed since a special Board of Inquiry (BoI) which was set up by President David Granger to probe the arbitrary firing of staff at the Public Service Ministry handed over its report to the Government but there has been no word as to its findings.Director General at the Ministry of the Presidency, Joseph HarmonPublic Service Minister,Tabitha Sarabo-HalleyDirector General of the Ministry of the Presidency, Joseph Harmon recently told Guyana Times that the BoI completed the task that it had been assigned to and the report was submitted to Minister of State, Dawn Hastings, some two weeks ago.“The report was submitted to the Minister of State who I think has passed it on to the President. I have not seen it as yet. But, I think the Minister of State might be able to tell you a little bit more about it because the last I know, this is what had happened.”Harmon stated that although he was not provided with a copy of the report or has not yet been briefed as to its findings, the staff from the Public Service Ministry that are involved in the matter are still on administrative leave.“It [report] was completed and it was sent to her [Minister Hastings] and then I think she passed it on to the President. So, I don’t know whether the President has completed his reviewing of it. I cannot say specifically.”He noted that until a decision is made in relation to the BoI report, the staff remain on administrative leave.Almost three weeks ago, Minister Sarabo-Halley defended the firing of staff members from her department shortly after she would have assumed office, saying that there was evidence at her disposal to warrant dismissal.“I think that the evidence that was before me suggested that something needed to be done and the investigation would bear whether or not that was rational,” the Minister stated at a recent press conference.She, nevertheless, did not reveal any bit of evidence that she referred to but noted that the investigation will soon wrap up with the findings.On May 31, 2019, the personnel staff and chief accountant at the Public Service Ministry were sent packing by Minister Tabitha Sarabo-Halley shortly after she was appointed to that post.When the news broke about the arbitrary firing of personnel staff and the chief accountant, the Government initially denied firing them but one week after, Director General Harmon confirmed that indeed, the workers were sent home.But he said higher authorities had since intervened and the dismissed staff were eventually sent on administrative leave, pending the outcome of the investigation. He had maintained that the staff in question are still employees of the Government as the decision by Minister Sarabo-Halley to terminate their services has been halted.ScholarshipsHowever, Opposition Leader Bharrat Jagdeo had alluded to the fact that the fired workers were initially targeted and arbitrarily dismissed after they revealed that the children of a Government Minister received payments amounting to over $20 million in the last two years.One of those revelations is that the children of Minister Simona Broomes had allegedly received over US$86,000 in 2018, monies that were transferred from the Department of Public Service. Then again, this year, another transfer of millions reportedly took place.Given the controversy around that situation, the Public Service Department has made a decision to publicise all scholarships to ensure “transparency”. It was confirmed that both children of the Minister in question received grants to study overseas, but Sarabo-Halley could not state if the monies were transferred to their personal accounts.last_img read more

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New faces a welcome sight at Black Sox practices

first_imgThe Fort St. John Black Sox held their first practice of the year at the Kid’s Arena Fieldhouse on Tuesday night, and they’ll be back at it again tomorrow night. Things were kept pretty simple for the club’s opening session but player/coach Ryan Stickel was happy with what he saw.Stickel said players brought a good attitude to the practice and seemed to have some jump in their step as things got underway.“We just want to make sure that the guys are nice and athletic and haven’t bulked up too much over the off season,” he said. “Everybody’s arms looked good and loose and everybody seemed pretty fired and ready to go for the ball season so that was really good to see.”- Advertisement -Some new faces also made it out, with more expected to come as well on Friday.“There were a couple of guys that have played before here and there that missed last year. A few guys came back so that was good to see. Friday it sounds like we’re going to have a few more new guys. Right now I’m not looking at anything specific as far as talent goes. Just trying to get everybody loose and get throwing and get back into the swing of things right now.”Friday’s practice will be at the Kid’s Arena Fieldhouse at 8:30 p.m. Anyone wanting to be a part of the team this year is encouraged to attend.Advertisementlast_img read more

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Colony disorder threatens hives

first_img“If the researchers that are working on it don’t get a cure soon, if people are losing 70 percent of their hives now, it doesn’t take long before there’s no more bees,” Lindsay said. Lindsay, 37, keeps hives at his remote Saugus home and does beekeeping as a side job from his career as a mechanic. He drives as far away as Fresno to bring his bees to farmers for crop pollination, starting with California’s massive almond crop in February and moving on to apples and cherries. Farmers who rent hives from beekeepers also are worried about the mysterious colony collapse disorder, since dozens of crops depend on bees. Nationwide, about 40 percent to 60 percent of the honeybee population has been hurt in some way by colony collapse disorder, said Richard Adee of the American Honey Producers Association, who testified earlier this year about the problem before a U.S. House subcommittee. In hives hit hard by the problem, bees just disappear and beekeepers open their hives to find them empty. Beekeepers in 38 states have reported problems. SAUGUS – From their launching pad of wooden box hives, Jim Lindsay’s honeybees fly past barren brown hillsides and toward the lush landscaping of the city below. So far, Lindsay’s 80 bee colonies have been untouched by colony collapse disorder, a mysterious problem killing droves of bees nationwide. Another threat to Lindsay and other Santa Clarita Valley beekeepers is more plainly visible – a lack of rain has robbed mountains of plants the bees normally feed on. But it’s the less visible threat Lindsay calls CCD that has him and other beekeepers scratching their heads. Despite the fancy name, no one knows exactly what colony collapse disorder is, or how it kills bees. “We’ve never seen this problem of this magnitude in the past,” Adee said. “We’ve had colony collapse in the past but it was more regional.” California becomes a magnet for honeybees in February and March, when beekeepers bring hives into the state to pollinate almond crops. During that time, the number of domesticated bee colonies in the state goes from 475,000 to 1.3 million, said Orin Johnson, president of the California State Beekeepers Association. Despite the loss of bees from colony collapse disorder, this was a good year for almond pollination, because in excellent weather the bees touched down on more plants, Johnson said. But as the year has worn on, and beekeepers have moved on from almond orchards to apple, cherry, blueberry and other crops, they continue to worry about colony collapse disorder. Scientists are far from agreeing on what is causing the bees to disappear. They say certain pesticides – especially those containing a nicotine-based component – could be decimating bee colonies, and many beekeepers ascribe to that view. But in addition to nicotinoid insecticides, researchers have found other possible suspects, including pathogens, such as fungus and bacteria, certain viruses and poor nutrition. Instead of a single culprit, the problem could be a combination of factors, said Eric Mussen, a honeybee expert at the University of California, Davis. “This is not a new phenomenon, it happens periodically,” Mussen said. “We’ve never been able to explain why up until this period in time, so I don’t know if we’re going to do a whole lot better this time.” Massive bee deaths happened in the 1890s, and reoccurred occasionally in recent decades, he said. One difference is no one had cell phones back then, and some speculate that the most recent disappearance of bees has been caused by cell phone signals resonating in bees’ tiny brains, making them lose their way. To prove that, scientists would need to put electrodes into the brains of bees, and no one has bothered to do that, Mussen said. Dry conditions are a more obvious factor jeopardizing the health of bee colonies, because less plant moisture means fewer plants, and less food for foraging bees, experts say. Barring drought, the Santa Clarita Valley has always been a prime area for honey bees because of ample supplies of sage, buckwheat, sugar bush and other plants, said retired beekeeper John Goit, 65. “Probably every mountaintop in Santa Clarita has a stack of bees on it,” Goit said. Unlike bee colonies that are moved from farm to farm, bees that stay in the valley are more healthy because their food source is varied and untainted by pesticides, Goit said. But bees do need to be moved from farm to farm, because honey production is less important than it once was. Cheap honey imports from China have hurt U.S. honey producers in the past 20 years. Instead of making honey, most beekeepers focus on renting out their hives to farmers for crop pollination. Nowadays, about half the beekeeping business in the Santa Clarita Valley is for honey production, and the rest is dedicated to agricultural pollination, Goit said. Goit, who lives in the Antelope Valley, used to have 240 bee colonies, with many of them in the Santa Clarita Valley. But he recently sold almost all of them and retired. Along with the disappearance of bees, the disappearance of beekeepers like Goit also worries Johnson, of the California State Beekeepers Association. And beekeepers who lost most of their hives to colony collapse disorder may go under, he said. Already, beekeepers are an older set, with the average age being 60. “Most beekepers are second or third generation,” Johnson said. But even as veteran beekeepers are leaving the business because of dying bees, beekeeping novices like Lance Atkinson want in. Atkinson, 51, is getting into beekeeping from an unusual background – his Burbank-based business called Bee Experts exterminates bee hives for homeowners. He goes out with full-length overalls and a hat with a veil, and beehives are no match for him, even though the Africanized honeybees – knows as killer bees for their aggressive nature – always attack the exposed parts around his ankles. Driven by a desire to do more than just kill bees, Atkinson said he wants to move problem beehives from the city up to a 20-acre rural property in Kern County, where he will use the bees for pollination. So despite the mysterious ailment killing bees, there are bees to be found, Atkinson said. “I think with all these wild bees that are invading the homes,” he said, “it’s possible we have something very positive going on here.” alex.dobuzinskis@dailynews.com (661) 257-5253 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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Power line failure creates rolling outages in Fort St. John

first_img“Now that we’ve looked at it more closely, we can see that we needed to actually affect a physical repair – replacing a section of the line,” Gammer explains.To ensure this repair is done safely and effectively, Gammer says B.C. Hydro now has to engage in the process of switching – temporarily expanding the outage area.“There are more customers out right now, but we’ll get those back on quickly and then the remainder will be back on, we’ve estimated roughly 6:30 p.m. local time tonight.”- Advertisement -Gammer concludes by reminding residents that the times posted are only estimates.“It may require that it is going to take more time.”Gammer suggest you check B.C. Hydro’s website or mobile app, ask a friends or family member in an area with power to go online, or stay tuned to your local radio news network for the latest details.Advertisementlast_img read more

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From Zico to Neymar, Lasmars remain Brazil’s WC surgeons

first_img0Shares0000Orthopaedic surgeon Rodrigo Lasmar, who operated on Brazilian star Neymar’s foot, is following in the family line © AFP/File / NELSON ALMEIDASAO PAULO, Brazil, Mar 30 – Following in his father’s footsteps, orthopaedic surgeon Rodrigo Lasmar’s operation on superstar Neymar has proved crucial in preparing Brazil’s billion-dollar team for their tilt at World Cup glory.Back in 1986, Neylor Lasmar was called upon to fix the knee of the star of the Brazilian team heading to Mexico and aiming to win a first World Cup since 1970, Zico. Although just a teenager, young Rodrigo was afforded the privilege of accompanying his father throughout that tournament.“He met all the players, he was very involved,” Neylor Lasmar recently told Brazilian daily O Estado de Minas.Now 46, Rodrigo Lasmar is carrying on the family tradition and his role in mending Neymar’s broken foot is every bit as crucial to the Selecao’s World Cup hopes in Russia as his father’s skills had been 32 years ago.Like his father, Lasmar’s reputation preceded him and his selection by Neymar for the crucial task briefly made him the most important man in his homeland.“In the end, it’s the patient who decides which surgeon will operate on him — it’s about confidence,” Lasmar’s predecessor as the Brazil team’s chief medic Jose Luiz Runco told AFP.A measure of Lasmar’s importance in a football-mad nation that treats its star players almost as demi-gods was evident in the soap opera that led up to Neymar’s operation.It was a classic tug-of-war between club and country — and there was no doubt who came out on top.Neymar’s heart is Brazilian yellow, not Parisian blue.When he suffered the injury on February 25, speculation was rife over what to do, where to do it and who would be given the responsibility.The 26-year-old had joined Paris Saint-Germain for a world-record 222 million euros ($264 million) six months earlier, but Neymar is a national treasure in Brazil and their World Cup ambitions trumped PSG’s Champions League hopes.Brazilian fans still haven’t recovered from the pain of losing their star player to a broken vertebrae ahead of the 2014 World Cup semi-final on home soil and few want to be reminded of how the Selecao coped without him: a humiliating and record-equalling 7-1 thrashing by Germany.Uncertainty reigned until Lasmar returned from a conference in Russia to meet with Neymar’s representatives and PSG management.When the verdict was announced, Brazilians breathed a sigh of relief while Parisians were left deflated — and more so a few days later when Real Madrid dumped their Neymar-less side out of the Champions League.Neymar was going under the knife immediately, but not in Paris and one of its reputed clinics; in Lasmar’s home town of Belo Horizonte.– Accused of lying –To add insult to PSG’s injury, Lasmar stated Neymar’s foot had suffered a full fracture rather than the less serious hairline version diagnosed by French doctors.Neymar would be out for up to three months rather than the “six to eight weeks” previously announced by the player’s father.He was in a race against time to be fit for the World Cup, not to play any further part in PSG’s season.The next day, an article in French newspaper L’Equipe citing sources close to PSG accused Lasmar of having lied about the true nature of Neymar’s injury to ensure he would be kept in cotton wool until Brazil needed him.PSG were reduced to sending their prefered surgeon Gerard Saillant — renowned for having operated on Brazilian great Ronaldo’s knee in late 2000 — as Lasmar spent an hour and a quarter on Neymar on March 3.“He faced up to all the pressure very well, he’s a very focussed person,” said Runco, who passed the Brazil baton to Lasmar in 2014.Lasmar had joined Runco’s backroom staff in 2001 and went to the World Cup a year later.Ironically, that was where Ronaldo, freshly patched up by Saillant, fired Brazil to their last World Cup success with a brace in the 2-0 final victory over Germany.Saillant’s handiwork had left its mark on Lasmar.“What impressed me most was the recovery of Rivaldo and Ronaldo, whose presence had been uncertain,” Lasmar said in an interview with Hoje em Dia.Neymar’s injury is not as serious as Ronaldo’s was, but Lasmar will hope his surgical skills stand the test of time in the way Saillant’s did, and that Neymar emulates his striking predecessor.Whatever happens, one person is particularly proud of Lasmar: his father Neylor.“For us, it’s highly gratifying that he was called upon to operate on Neymar, as I was with Zico before,” he said. “It’s an honour to operate on a star footballer.”If Neymar succeeds where Zico failed, Lasmar’s fame in Brazil will only grow.0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today)last_img read more

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Airports dot Los Angeles area

first_imgJust after noon on Dec. 17, 1903, taking off into a freezing head wind near Kitty Hawk, N.C., Orville Wright made history with his 12-second flight in a wood-and-fabric biplane dubbed the Wright Flyer. That flight inaugurated the aerial age – one that inspired scientific inventions, launched commercial industries and spawned its own culture. With its excellent flying weather, Los Angeles County became a magnet for record-breaking aviation pioneers and top-secret aerospace ventures. The aviation industry remains a vital part of the economy and lifestyle of Southern California, which boasts 49 nonmilitary airports. Los Angeles International Airport, among the nation’s busiest, serves more than 60 million travelers a year. But smaller commercial operations, as well as general-aviation airports, also are critical to local economies. He opened it to the public in 1946, creating a haven for pilots of small propeller aircraft. The field got a control tower in 1989 and a radar system in 2000 to help track the myriad planes flying in and out of Whiteman, Van Nuys and Burbank. Whiteman also is one of three weather-monitoring sites in L.A. for the National Weather Service. Van Nuys Airport Averaging 400,000 takeoffs and landings annually on its two parallel runways, Van Nuys Airport is the world’s busiest general-aviation facility. It was founded as Metropolitan Airport in 1928, taken over by the military in 1942, then sold to the city of Los Angeles in 1949. Popular with the entertainment industry, it was used in the closing scenes of “Casablanca”; in series such as “Alias” and “24”; and in a documentary about the airport titled “One Six Right.” The airport is in the midst of a multimillion-dollar building boom, with charter companies scrambling to meet soaring demand for private air service. The development plans include a 39-acre “propeller park” to accommodate private pilots. Clover Field was established in 1922, named for World War I pilot Greayer Clover. It became a testing site for military planes being produced by Donald Douglas in an abandoned movie studio nearby. In 1924, eight Army airmen flying in four open-cockpit Douglas World Cruisers departed Santa Monica for a daring around-the-world flight. Two of the biplanes completed the journey, becoming the first to circumnavigate the globe. Douglas left Clover Field after World War II. Today, the airport houses propeller planes and private jets, and its hangars are popular venues for civic events. Santa Monica Airport In 2015, the Federal Aviation Administration will lose its lease on the control tower. The airport may then be closed and its land redeveloped. Palmdale Regional Airport Now one of the world’s biggest civilian airports at 5,800 acres, Palmdale Regional Airport was built by the U.S. government in 1940 as an emergency landing strip for a nearby air base. After being operated by Los Angeles County from 1940-46, it reverted to the federal government as part of Air Force Plant 42, a manufacturing and testing operation for military aircraft. Los Angeles bought land around the site in 1966, in the hope of someday operating an airport similar in size to LAX. However, the High Desert airport has only had limited success with commercial flights, with United Airlines now offering twice-daily flights between Palmdale and San Francisco. Northrop Airport in Hawthorne World War II started the same year aerospace pioneer Jack Northrop founded Northrop Corp., building a plant and dirt airstrip on 72 acres in Hawthorne. The company was an important manufacturer of bombers and fighters for the war effort and in 1946 tested the B-35 Flying Wing, a forerunner of the B-2 stealth bomber. Northrop donated the airport to Hawthorne in 1948, and continued working in the area until his death in 1981. Northrop Corp. stayed in Hawthorne until 1994, manufacturing multiple military planes, before merging with Grumman Aerospace Corp. The airport was named for Northrop in 1996. Compton Airport With two short runways and no control tower, Compton Woodley Airport is a student pilot paradise. Founded in 1924, it caters mainly to small aircraft. Long Beach Airport Aviator Frank Champion performed daring stunts in 1910 over The Pike, the now-defunct amusement park, a year before Calbraigh Perry Rodgers landed a biplane near Pine Avenue Pier to complete the first cross-country flight in U.S. history. Earl Daugherty was taught to fly by Champion in 1911, and performed with wingwalker Wesley May. He leased land for his barnstorming show and a flight school, and persuaded Long Beach officials to develop an airfield on the site in 1923. Douglas Aircraft Co. opened a manufacturing plant at the airport in 1941, building B-17 bombers. During World War II, a Women’s Auxiliary Ferrying Squadron piloted military aircraft from the assembly line to destinations all over the country. In 1947, aviator Howard Hughes chose Long Beach to test the eight-engine Spruce Goose. On its first and only flight, the “flying boat” took off from the beach, and flew for about a mile at an altitude of 70 feet. After the war, Long Beach continued as a leader in aircraft production as Douglas merged with McDonnell Co., then with Boeing. The city’s largest employer, it produced commercial jets in Long Beach until 2006, and continues to manufacture its C-17 military cargo plane. Today, Long Beach Airport serves 3 million passengers a year on four major carriers. It also is a popular general-aviation airport, with 370,000 operations a year. Zamperini Field in Torrance What is now a general-aviation airfield that sees nearly 500 takeoffs and landings daily used to be a great place for lima beans to grow. But after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, those bean fields were uprooted and the Lomita Airstrip was built. In 1943-44, pilots were trained here to fly the Lockheed P-38, a fighter known to its foes as the “fork-tailed devil.” After World War II, the field was turned over to Torrance, and in 1946 was named for Torrance native Louis Zamperini, an Olympic runner and war hero. Last year, the airport welcomed the Western Museum of Flight, which had been at Hawthorne Airport for 20 years.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREWhicker: Clemson demonstrates that it’s tough to knock out the champ“There were many fliers in (Southern California) that rose up and created the aerospace industry as we know it today,” said Dennis Lord, chairman of the Los Angeles County Aviation Commission. “At one time, there were 80 to 90 local airports scattered across this region. Most have succumbed to the pressures of local development as land prices escalate. But those that remain continue to reinvent themselves to address an ever-changing marketplace.” Read about other local airports below. Whiteman Airport Marvin E. Whiteman, a pilot and airplane collector, took over a few carrot and corn fields in Pacoima in the 1940s and built himself an airport. last_img read more

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JetHawks take on AVC on April 4

first_img 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! The JetHawks will play Antelope Valley College’s baseball team April 4 at Clear Channel Stadium, the first meeting between the teams. The game will be the Single-A JetHawks’ first appearance in the Antelope Valley this year. Tickets to the game are $5, with half the proceeds going to the AVC baseball program. All area high school baseball players receive free admission. “We are thrilled to be able to host the Marauders in what should prove to be a great community event for the Antelope Valley,” JetHawks general manager Brad Seymour said in a statement. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORESanta Anita opens winter meet Saturday with loaded card – Gideon Rubin last_img read more

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